Vertiba, Salesforce and Arapahoe Ridge join millions in teaching computer science

by Meghan Ciacci, December 10th, 2016

Arapahoe Ridge Elementary Brings the Hour Code to Students with Vertiba and Salesforce

20161208_121629On Thursday, December 8, Vertiba and Salesforce team members gathered at Arapahoe Ridge Elementary in Westminster, CO to participate in their Hour of Code event. The Hour of Code is a national movement hosted by Computer Science Education Week and Code.org. The goal of the campaign is to introduce students to computer science and computer programming.  The students of Arapahoe Ridge were among more than 2 million worldwide spending one hour learning the basics of computer science.

Vertiba and Salesforce joined first through fifth grade classrooms as guest volunteers.  First and second grade coded Angry Birds to catch the naughty pigs. The third, fourth and fifth grade students built a galaxy far, far away  in the Star Wars module. As a final step in the Star Wars tutorial, the student were able to create their own game. The Hour of Code activities are self-guided. Each student was able to move at their own pace. Vertiba and Salesforce team members were on hand to guide the students if they got stuck on any of the coding steps.

Vertiba and Salesforce breaking for lunch at Hour of Code event
Vertiba and Salesforce breaking for lunch at Hour of Code event

“It was great to see the students excited to work on the code tutorials and how quickly they grasped the concept,” said Blaine Cooper-Surma, Vertiba Solution Architect. “Developers are going to have some fierce competition in 12-15 years.”

Statistics Show Students Enjoy Computer Science

While one hour doesn’t lend enough time to be an experienced coder, one hour does provide enough time to teach students that computer science is fun, creative and accessible at all ages, gender, ethnicity or socioeconomic status.  A shocking statistic from Computer Science Week and Code.org reveals that more than 54 percent of students enjoy computer science and the arts over other subjects. However, another shocking statistic shows that only 40 percent of schools teach computer programming.

“More and more jobs are requiring computer science knowledge,” said John Conley, Salesforce Customer Success Director. ” It is very important to teach students the fundamentals, but it’s more than just preparing them for job opportunities. It’s teaching students computational thinking which is a key skill that can be applied to a variety of situations as well as professions, ” added Conley.

Fourth grade class coding Star Wars
Fourth grade class coding Star Wars

As a result of the Hour of Code event, participating teachers, students and volunteers have decided to go beyond one hour. Many are now leaning for an entire day or even the entire Computer Science Week.  The Hour of Code has encouraged some students to enroll in a computer science course (or even a college major), according to the Hour of Code website.

 

 

To learn more about how to participate or host an Hour of Code event next year, please visit www.hourofcode.org.